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NDNU Policy, Rules and Regulations on Service Animals

Download a PDF of the Policy on Service AnimalsPDF

Definitions

Service Animal: NDNU adopts the definition of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) which defines service animal as “…any… animal trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including, but not limited to, guiding individuals with impaired vision, alerting individuals who are hearing impaired to intruders or sounds, providing minimal protection or rescue work, pulling a wheelchair, or fetching dropped items.”

Partner/Handler: A person with a service or therapy animal. A person with a disability is called a partner. A person without a disability is called a handler.

Approved Service Animal: A service animal that has been approved by NDNU’s PASS director after review of documentation submitted by or on behalf of a partner/handler.

Requestor: A person submitting a request and documentation on behalf of a partner/handler for approval of a service animal.

Policy

An individual who needs the use of a service animal is required to notify the university and to request and receive approval for use of a service animal prior to bringing the animal on campus. The individual is required to provide the university with proof that the individual has a disability as defined by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the ADA, that the animal at issue is individually trained to do tasks to assist the individual, and that the animal is properly vaccinated, licensed and meets weight requirements. For a service animal to be allowed in campus buildings, the animal must be necessary to assist the individual in the activities of daily living and trained to fulfill those functions. Pets, therapy, companion or comfort animals do not meet the definition of service animal and are not permitted in campus buildings, with the exception that in campus housing, a service animal may be permitted if it is a reasonable accommodation for emotional disabilities of a resident. Each request will be reviewed on a case by case basis.

An approved service animal is allowed to accompany the partner/handler at all times and in all campus locations, except where service animals are prohibited due to health or safety restrictions, where they may be in danger, or where their use may compromise the integrity of research. Examples of these locations are as follows: research laboratories, classrooms with demonstration/research animals, wood shops and metal/machine shops, electrical shops, mechanical rooms and custodial closets. Exceptions to restricted areas may be granted on a case-be-case basis by contacting the PASS Office and the appropriate department and/or laboratory representative. PASS will make the final decision. Service animals may not reside in university housing without express written approval of the PASS director.

Request for Approval of a Service Animal

To request approval for a service animal, the requestor must make a formal written request to the PASS director and must provide documentation as described below:

Verification for Need of a Service Animal/Verification of Disability

The requestor must provide to the PASS director documentation that the partner/handler has a disabling condition or impairment and that the service animal is required so that the partner/handler may use the university’s facilities and/or services. NDNU accepts as documentation a signed letter from the partner/handler’s health care provider, on the health care provider’s professional letterhead, that outlines the following:

  • The nature of the disabling condition or impairment including whatever information the university may reasonably need to ensure compliance with the law
  • The provider’s professional opinion that the partner/handler requires the service animal to use the university’s facilities and services
  • The function(s) the animal may provide

Vaccinations, License, and Weight for the Service Animal

The requestor must provide to the PASS director documentation that the service animal has up-to-date vaccinations and immunizations against diseases, that the service animal is currently licensed in the city of residence, and that the service animal weighs at least eight pounds but no more than 125 pounds.

If a service animal is approved, the requestor must provide proof of up-to-date vaccinations and immunizations each year.

Related NDNU Policies, Requirements and Procedures

Timelines

The requestor must provide the PASS director with all required documentation at least 25 business days prior to use of the university’s facilities and services. Within ten business days of receipt of a request, the PASS director will respond to the requestor regarding any missing documentation. Once the PASS director has verified that the required documentation has been received, within ten business days, or as soon as practicable, PASS will arrange a meeting to clarify the needs of the partner/handler, relevant university policies and restrictions, and accommodations that the partner/handler should expect from the university. This meeting will include the partner/handler, the PASS director, and any relevant university representatives.

Registration with PASS

A person with a documented disability must be registered with PASS in order to receive accommodations and services related to the disability.

Veterinary Attention

The university has continuing authority to direct that a service animal receive veterinary attention.

Responsibilities of Persons Who Bring Service Animals to the NDNU Campus

  • Care for and supervise the service animal
  • Maintain control of the animal at all times - service animals must be on a leash at all times
  • Ensure the clean-up of all animal waste
  • Ensure that each service animal is immunized against diseases common to that type of animal
  • Ensure that each service animal is vaccinated against rabies, distemper, parvovirus and all other community expected vaccinations
  • Ensure that each service animal wears a rabies vaccination tag and license, as prescribed by California law, as well as a name tag and emergency telephone number
  • Each year that the service animal is on the university campus, provide to the PASS director a certificate by a licensed veterinarian attesting to good health of the service animal
  • Take financial responsibility for any property damage caused by the service animal
  • Notify the general public of expectations of behavior around the service animal. Examples of these notifications are as follows:
    • Unless you are invited to do so, do not touch or feed a service animal
    • Do not come between or attempt to separate a service animal from its handler
    • Do not deliberately startle a service animal
    • Allow a service animal to accompany the partner at all times and everywhere on campus except where service animals are prohibited.

Removal of Service Animals

The partner of a service animal may be asked to remove the animal if the animal is unruly or disruptive (e.g. barking, running around, aggressive behavior). If the behavior persists, the partner may be told to refrain from bringing the animal onto university facilities until the problem is remediated. Service animals that are in ill health and/or uncleanly are not permitted on university facilities.

Further Definitions

Team: A team is a person with a disability, or a handler, and her or his service animal. The twosome works as a cohesive team in accomplishing the tasks of everyday living.

Types of Service Dogs

Guide Dog is a carefully trained dog that serves as a travel tool by persons with severe visual impairments or who are blind.

Hearing Dog is a dog who has been trained to alert a person with significant hearing loss or who is deaf when a sound occurs (i.e., a bell ringing).

Service Dog is a dog that has been trained to assist a person who has a mobility or health impairment. Types of duties the dog may perform include carrying, fetching, opening doors, ringing doorbells, activating elevator buttons, steadying a person while walking, helping a person up after the person falls, etc. Service dogs are sometimes called assistance dogs.

Ssig Dog is a dog trained to assist a person with autism. The dog alerts the partner to distracting repetitive movements common among those with autism, allowing the person to stop the movement (e.g., hand flapping). A person with autism may have problems with sensory input and need the same support services from a dog that a dog might give to a person who is blind or deaf.

Seizure Response Dog is a dog trained to assist a person with a seizure disorder; how the dog serves the person depends on the person’s needs. The dog may stand guard over the person during a seizure, or the dog may go for help. A few dogs have somehow learned to predict a seizure and warn the person in advance.

NDNU’s Policy on Service Animals Related to Visitors on Campus

Service Animal: NDNU adopts the definition of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) which defines service animal as “…any… animal trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including, but not limited to, guiding individuals with impaired vision, alerting individuals who are hearing impaired to intruders or sounds, providing minimal protection or rescue work, pulling a wheelchair, or fetching dropped items.”

Policy

NDNU’s Policy on Service Animals is also in effect for visitors who bring a service animal on campus.
In addition to the policy, the following procedures are in effect for those persons bringing a service animal to campus during a short stay:

  • A person bringing a service animal on campus for a visit must notify housing (for residence visits) and PASS at least 72 hours prior to the visit
  • The procedures under the policy heading "Request for Approval of a Service Animal" must be followed and documentation must be presented:

An individual who needs the use of a service animal is required to notify the university and to request and receive approval for use of a service animal prior to bringing the animal on campus.  The individual is required to provide the university with proof that the individual has a disability as defined by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the ADA, that the animal at issue is individually trained to do tasks to assist the individual, and that the animal is properly vaccinated, licensed and meets weight requirements.  For a service animal to be allowed in campus buildings, the animal must be necessary to assist the individual in the activities of daily living and trained to fulfill those functions. Pets, therapy, companion or comfort animals do not meet the definition of service animal and are not permitted in campus buildings.

An approved service animal is allowed to accompany the partner/handler at all times and in all campus locations, except where service animals are prohibited due to health or safety restrictions, where they may be in danger, or where their use may compromise the integrity of research. Examples of these locations are as follows: research laboratories, classrooms with demonstration/research animals, wood shops and metal/machine shops, electrical shops, mechanical rooms and custodial closets. Exceptions to restricted areas may be granted on a case-be-case basis by contacting the PASS Office and the appropriate department and/or laboratory representative. PASS will make the final decision. Service animals may not reside in university housing without express written approval of the PASS director.

Request for Approval of a Service Animal

To request approval for a service animal to be in residence areas, the requestor must make a formal written request to the PASS director and must provide documentation as described below. Approval must be granted by the PASS director and Department of Housing and Residence Life. To request approval for a service animal to be in non-residence areas, the requestor must make a formal written request to the PASS director. Approval must be granted by the PASS director.

Verification for Need of a Service Animal/Verification of Disability

The requestor must provide to the PASS director documentation that the partner/handler has a disabling condition or impairment and that the service animal is required so that the partner/handler may use the university’s facilities and/or services. NDNU accepts as documentation a signed letter from the partner/handler’s health care provider, on the health care provider’s professional letterhead, that outlines the following:

  • The nature of the disabling condition or impairment including whatever information the university may reasonably need to ensure compliance with the law
  • The provider’s professional opinion that the partner/handler requires the service animal to use the university’s facilities and services
  • The function(s) the animal may provide

The requestor must provide to the PASS director documentation that the service animal has up-to-date vaccinations and immunizations against diseases, that the service animal is currently licensed in the city of residence, and that the service animal weighs at least eight pounds but no more than 125 pounds.

Please refer to the full Service Animal Policy for further information.