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Catalog

Clinical Psychology

CPY4216 Psychopathology (3)
This course introduces students to the study and understanding of psychological disorders. The study of psychopathology is approached from the standpoint of individual character structure/personality and the context of treatment. The etiology and dynamics of character structure and the development of symptoms and personality disorders will be examined and discussed. Symptom formation and character disorders will be examined primarily from dynamic, developmental, and socio-cultural perspectives, with attention given to cultural assumptions underlying classifications of psychopathology and the development of biopsychosocial case formulations. The course will discuss the importance of developing an integrative approach to treatment by taking into account the treatment context, the socio-cultural context, and the nature of the evidence on which assertions about effectiveness of treatment are based.  Students will also become acquainted with current classification systems (e.g. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition). BBS 4980.37 (a-1)

CPY4217 Child and Adolescent Psychopathology and Psychotherapy (3)
This course explores forms of psychopathology, mental disorder, and normal and abnormal development in children and adolescents and their treatment.  It incorporates the perspective of developmental psychopathology for understanding etiology, assessment, and treatment. The course focuses on adapative and maladaptive behaviors and psychological processes, as well as risk and protective factors within the child, family, and environment, while addressing cultural issues including ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and gender differences. Forms of psychotherapy that address psychopathology in children and adolescents will be surveyed.

CPY4221 Cross-Cultural Issues (3)
This course is designed to help students acquire theoretical and empirical literature about the role of culture in human behavior; assist students in gaining knowledge about cross-cultural transitions, as well as attend to and reflect on their encounters in a cultural context that is different from their native culture; and facilitate students' integration of personal experiences and knowledge of psychological literature into practical implications of working with diverse individuals and in different helping roles. The course emphasizes the students' understanding and integration of theory and research findings about the relationships between culture and psychology, development of skills to apply the knowledge about the impact of culture on psychology to themselves and helping others, and continuous reflection on their multi-dimensional cross-cultural experiences. Provides an overview of the principles of mental health recovery-oriented care and methods of service delivery in recovery-oriented practice models. Attention is given to the intersection of multiple cultural influences, as well as power differences that occur between groups.  BBS 4980.37 (a-7)

CPY4222 Family Systems and Relational Psychotherapy (3)
This course examines the application of a variety of systemic and relational theories and models of intervention to interpersonal and relational problems with a strong emphasis on contemporary systems, interpersonal, attachment, humanistic, and relational theories. Reviews principles of mental health recovery-oriented care and methods of service delivery as appropriate within systems. This course emphasizes systemic therapy approaches for resolving individual, interpersonal, couple, and family problems. Developmental and intervention considerations of non-traditional and diverse couples and families are examined. BBS 4980.37 (a-3), 4980.40 (1,2)

CPY4230 Lifespan Development (3)
This course provides an analysis of major approaches to the study of human development from infancy to old age, reviewing specific family life events and the psychological implications of developmental milestones such as childbirth, childrearing, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, marriage, divorce, career, blended families, parenting, aging and long-term care, and geropsychology. An overview of the individual differences and biological, cultural, socioeconomic, and environmental factors that influence growth and development across the lifespan will be provided. BBS 4980.40 (3)

CPY4235 Human Sexuality (1)
This course offers a study of the psychological, social, and physiological dimensions of human sexual behavior. Emphasis is placed on the diversity of human sexual development and current research. Reflection of individual attitudes about sexuality and the sources that have affected the development of those attitudes is encouraged. Deviations, dysfunctions, and controversies in sexuality are presented. BBS 4980.81 (c)

CPY4240 Psychodynamic Psychotherapy (3)
Provides a clinical survey of theoretical and empirical psychodynamic psychotherapy approaches and topics, including evidence-based practice. Approaches include Freudian, Jungian, Ego Psychology, Object Relations, Humanistic, Self Psychology, Developmental, and Relational perspectives. Specific topics surveyed may include the psychotherapeutic relationship; development of student/clinician qualities; developmental issues, relationships, and transitions and their impact on health; trauma and its treatment; and clinical practice issues for individuals with a range of diagnoses (including severe mental illness) such as assessment, diagnosis, treatment planning, interventions, and collaborative treatment practices. BBS 4980.37 (a-5)

CPY4245 Professional Ethics and Law (3)
This course examines ethical and legal standards, codes, and issues within the mental health professions and their relevant professional, clinical, and personal dimensions and implications. While covering legal and ethical issues requisite for licensure, it also emphasizes personal and professional development, the development of student qualities, and the impact
of personal values as an integral part of cultivating an ethical attitude within the field of psychology. The course emphasizes the relationship between the development of personal qualities, sense of self, values, professional behavior, ethics, and clinical practice. Specific topics include child and elder abuse assessment and reporting; scope of practice; legal patterns and trends; privilege/confidentiality; treatment of minors; professional writing; evidence-based practice; collaborative treatment; case management; and community resources. BBS 4980.81 (a, 1-5)

CPY4252 Clinical Assessment and Treatment (3)
This course introduces the basic appraisal concepts, various instruments, procedures, methods, and interview techniques used for developmental, behavioral, cognitive, affective, learning, and personality assessment. Emphasis is placed on understanding, criticizing, and using the assessment report to assist in the development of an approach to treatment. Appropriate treatment planning and collaborative treatment with health care providers and family members will be reviewed. BBS 4980.40 (4), 4980.81 (B, F);BBS 4999.33

CPY4275 Couples Psychotherapy (3)
This course examines the theory and practice of psychotherapy with couples. Conscious and unconscious patterns of communication, behaviors, interactions, and defenses are discussed. The course reviews a variety of issues encountered in couple psychotherapy, including transitions to parenthood and childrearing, problems with intimacy and sex, substance use, infidelity, abuse and domestic violence, and more. The context of the couple is examined from a socio-cultural perspective, with attention paid to diverse types of couples and relationships. Assessment, diagnosis, and intervention strategies for couples are reviewed. BBS 4980.81 (e), 4980.40 (2) (3)

CPY4280 Survey of Child and Adult Psychotherapy (2)
This course surveys a variety of treatment approaches for children and adults and may incorporate training in modalities such as play therapy; expressive arts therapy; sandplay therapy; somatic, and experiential therapies. Possible topics include treating premarital, couple, family, and child relationships.   Other survey topics include treating trauma and abuse, dysfunctions, healthy functioning, health promotion, illness prevention, working with families, professional writing, including documentation of services, treatment plans, and progress notes; and connecting people with resources.

CPY4286 Specialized Clinical Topics (1)
This course focuses on a variety of specialized clinical topics, including alternative psychotherapeutic approaches, relevant for MFT/LPCC licensure. Topics range across the broad spectrum of clinical practice and research in the field of psychology, bringing students into contact with the most recent and sometimes controversial clinical issues. Topics are continually modified in accordance with evolving BBS recommendations and standards. BBS 4980.37 (2)

CPY4311 Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (3)
This course introduces students to Cognitive-Behavioral Theory and Technique as well as developments within Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy including Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). Students will learn about empirical findings that demonstrate its usefulness for a wide variety of problems, including mood disorders, anxiety disorders, personality disorders, eating disorders, substance abuse disorders, and psychotic disorders.   Students will learn to apply CBT; DBT; and ACT, and will learn to address a variety of clinical topics, as recommended by the BBS, through this treatment modality. BBS 4980.40 (1)

CPY4420 Clinical Practicum I  (3)
This two-semester sequence of supervised practicum in the field provides an average of 20 hours weekly (250 hours per semester) of supervised training and face-to-face psychotherapy experience with children, adolescents, adults, couples, and families in community agencies, schools, and hospitals throughout the Bay Area. A practicum packet must be completed and signed by all parties to ensure that the site, student, and faculty are in agreement of the BBS and departmental requirements. This clinical field placement meets the requirements of the Board of Behavioral Sciences for ongoing experience in the use of applied psychotherapeutic techniques, assessment, diagnosis, crisis intervention, and the treatment of individuals in need. Integrated strength-based recovery model, evidence-based and best practices, case management, working with co-occurring disorders, and collaborative treatment will be emphasized. Understanding of the impact of socioeconomic position and culture will also be emphasized. BBS 4980.40 (b,1,2, B, f, g), 4980.42 4980.43

CPY4422 Clinical Practicum II (3)
This two-semester sequence of supervised practicum in the field provides an average of 20 hours weekly (250 hours per semester) of supervised training and face-to-face psychotherapy experience with children, adolescents, adults, couples, and families in community agencies, schools, detention centers, and hospitals throughout the Bay Area. A practicum packet must be completed and signed by all parties to ensure that the site, student, and faculty are in agreement of the BBS and departmental requirements. This clinical field placement meets the requirements of the Board of Behavioral Sciences for ongoing experience in the use of applied psychotherapeutic techniques, assessment, diagnosis, crisis intervention, and the treatment of individuals in need. Integrated strength-based recovery models, evidence-based and best practices, case management, working with co-occurring disorders, and collaborative treatment will be emphasized. Understanding of the impact of socioeconomic position and culture will also be emphasized. BBS 4980.40 (b,1,2, B, f, g), 4980.42 4980.43

CPY4430 Clinical Case Seminar I (3)
Corequisite: CPY4420
This two-semester sequence accompanies CPY4420 and provides an intensive small-group seminar setting within which students may discuss their field placement experiences and their cases. Students focus on the personal issues involved in transference and counter-transference in their cases; develop a better sense of the relationship between the development of personal qualities, their sense of self, values, professional behavior, and ethics; learn to integrate theory with evidence-based practice; benefit from feedback from their colleagues and instructor; learn how to construct and present case analyses; develop professional writing skills; become acquainted with community resources and methods of collaborative treatment; develop psychotherapy, intervention, assessment, and case management skills, including methods for specialized issues; and explore this opportunity for profound professional growth. It will address many questions that beginning therapists face, including: how to conduct a first hour, make an initial assessment, set up a therapeutic frame, establish a therapeutic alliance, develop a treatment plan, listen to the patient's communications, use one's self in the treatment process, be alert to danger signals, work with cultural issues, handle crises, decide on which type of intervention to use, develop a working hypothesis/formulation of the patient's difficulties, termination, and more. This class augments and supports what students are learning academically and experientially, concurrently, in CPY4420. BBS 4980.42, 4980.43, 4980.40, 4980.37 (a,1-7,b), 4980.81 (a-5)

CPY4432 Clinical Case Seminar II  (3)
Corequisite: CPY4422
This two-semester sequence accompanies CPY4422 and provides an intensive small-group seminar setting within which students may discuss their field placement experiences and their cases. Students focus on the personal issues involved in transference and counter-transference in their cases; develop a better sense of the relationship between the development of personal qualities, their sense of self, values, professional behavior, and ethics; learn to integrate theory with evidence-based practice; benefit from feedback from their colleagues and instructor; learn how to construct and present case analyses and develop professional writing skills; become acquainted with community resources and methods of collaborative treatment; develop psychotherapy, intervention, assessment, and case management skills, including methods for specialized issues; and explore this opportunity for profound professional growth. It will address many questions that beginning therapists face, including: how to conduct a first hour, make an initial assessment, set up a therapeutic frame, establish a therapeutic alliance, develop a treatment plan, listen to the patient's communications, use one's self in the treatment process, be alert to danger signals, work with cultural issues, handle crises, decide on which type of intervention to use, develop a working hypothesis/formulation of the patient's difficulties, termination, and more. This class augments and supports what students are learning academically and experientially, concurrently, in CPY4422. BBS 4980.42, 4980.43, 4980.40, 4980.37 (a,1-7,b), 4980.81 (a-5)

CPY4882 Research Project: Capstone Completion (3)
This course enables the student to build upon their Capstone proposal; conduct and complete their research capstone. BBS 4980.37 (2,6), 4980.81 (a-2)

CPY4888 Research Project: Capstone Extension (3)
This course is offered for exceptional situations as an alternative to students who do not complete their capstone in the previous two courses.

CPY4896 Research Methods and Proposal (3)
This course provides an overview of research design and methodology culminating in developing a complete Master's Thesis or Capstone research proposal. Special emphasis is placed on helping the student conceptually understand the principles of psychological research, which informs evidence-based practice. Topics include observation and measurement, study design and implementation, descriptive and inferential statistics and the range of research projects including theses, needs assessments, grants, and program evaluations. This course culminates with the completion of a formal project proposal. BBS 4980.37 (2,6), 4980.81 (a-2)

CPY4897 Research Project: Thesis Completion (3)
This course enables the student to build upon their Thesis proposal; conduct and complete their thesis. BBS 4980.37 (2,6), 4980.81 (a-2)

CPY4898 Research Project: Thesis Extension (3)
This course is offered for exceptional situations as an alternative to students who do not complete their thesis in the previous two courses.

CPY5200 Group Psychotherapy (3)
This course provides an overview of group psychotherapy, including analysis of group development, dynamics, process, and agents of therapeutic change. Issues pertaining to group leadership, ethics, and work with special populations will be addressed. Emphasis will be placed on group developmental stage theories, group leadership styles and approaches, pertinent research and literature, group psychotherapy methods, and evaluation of effectiveness. An experiential laboratory group is included. BBS 4980.40 (2); BBS4999.33

CPY5205 Neurophysiology and Psychopharmacology: (3)
This course introduces the basic components of the brain and the central nervous system, focusing upon the role of sensation, perception, learning, mood, and memory in mental health. A review of the range of psychotropic medications used in the management of psychological health is included. Emphasizes understanding of how to collaborate and communicate effectively with health care providers and family members, including evidence-based and best practices to work with consumers with co-occurring disorders. Special emphasis will be placed on the new requirements regarding basic classifications, indications, and contraindications of commonly prescribed psychopharmacological medications so that appropriate referrals can be made for medical evaluations and so that the side effects of those medications can be identified. BBS 4980.81

CPY5265 Diagnosis and Treatment of Addictions (3)
This course focuses on the detection, evaluation, and treatment of substance abuse in a sociocultural context. It includes the historical and contemporary perspectives on alcohol and drug abuse, basic principles of diagnosis and assessment, and prevention and intervention strategies with diverse populations. Sociopolitical and cultural aspects of work in this area is emphasized. Reviews the principles of mental health recovery-oriented care and methods of service delivery in recovery-oriented practice environments. BBS 4980.81 (d)

CPY5550 Crisis, Trauma, and Recovery (3)
This course integrates a community-based approach to crisis theory, multidisciplinary responses to crises, emergencies, or disasters; cognitive, affective, behavioral, and neurological effects associated with trauma; brief, intermediate, and long-term approaches; assessment strategies for clients in crisis; principles of intervention for individuals with mental or emotional disorders during times of crisis or emergency; or other clinical topics. Trauma-specific theories and approaches are integrated along with patient advocacy, collaborative care and referrals, and community resources with emphasis on strength-based and evidence-based approaches. SB33; BBS4999.33.

CPY5560 Career Development Theories and Techniques (3)
Career development theories and techniques are surveyed, including career development decision-making models and interrelationships among and between work, family, and other life roles and factors, as well as the role of multicultural issues in career development.

CPY6992 Supervised Field Experience (3)
Offers supervised practicum hours that are not part of the degree or certificate program but that provide the opportunity for the collection of extra MFT field placement hours after the completion of 12 graduate units. Students meet with their University Field Supervisor by appointment after obtaining an approved field placement. A practicum packet must be completed and signed by all parties to ensure that the site, student, and faculty are in agreement of the BBS and departmental requirements. BBS 4980.40 (b-g), 4980.42, 4980.43