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Catalog

Education

Note: Some courses require additional payment of a Supervisor Fee. Candidates enrolled in the Multiple Subject or Single Subject programs are subject to a one-time Teaching Performance Assessment Fee regardless of when the candidate began the program.

EDU1003 Learning Strategies and Applications (2)
This course will equip students with the tools that will enable them to become efficient and independent learners. Through readings, discussions, and activities, students are introduced to various study skills and strategies that they can immediately apply to the courses they take.  Topics include goal-setting, memory principles, time management, note-taking, test-taking, reading, writing, utilizing learning support services, stress management, etc. Units apply toward graduation.

EDU2003 Physical Education in the Elementary School (3)
Focuses on acquiring knowledge and skills necessary to teach physical education activities to elementary age children and understanding the elementary school physical education curriculum, including movement, fitness and health, growth and development, games, dance, administrative considerations, and evaluation techniques. Also, new concepts of teaching physical education, including adaptive P.E., are covered.

EDU2006 Introduction to Education: Practicum in Teaching (3)
Assists students in examining the role of the teacher at the preschool through grade 12 level. Students are placed as classroom teacher aides at the grade level of their choice for three hours per week and attend an on-campus seminar. Permission of the instructor is required. Course is required for admission to credential programs.

EDU2009 Foundations of Leadership and Teamwork (1)
Focuses on the social change model of leadership development. The class begins with conceptual frameworks that contextualize the complexity of leadership in today’s society, followed by an examination of each value of the social change model. Students complete the course with a leadership project focused on social change and collaboration. Multimedia presentations, interactive exercises, and extra-credit opportunities are also incorporated to promote self-reflection and experiential learning.

EDU2012 Resident Assistantship (1)
This course is designed with an academic dimension as an extension of training and development for RAs. It is a sequenced course and provides the ongoing skills, training, and leadership development need to assist students in their positions and to grow as individuals. It provides in depth discussion and training on topics concerning residential communities, including communication skills, confrontation, working with diverse groups of students, critical issues, programming, and the importance of their roles as peer leaders. All RAs must take this course and receive a C or higher to retain their RA position.

EDU2018 Technology Application in Education (2)
California has adopted Technology Standards that define computer-based technology use in classrooms. This course ensures that all teacher candidates understand and are able to use appropriate computer-based technology to facilitate the teaching and learning process.  In addition to the California Level I Standards, the course covers issues surrounding technology use by society in general and education in particular. Also, several Teacher Performance Expectations (TPEs) from the California Standards of Quality Effectiveness for Professional Teacher Preparation Programs are addressed in this course.

EDU2080 Senior Seminar in Liberal Studies (3)
This capstone course for Liberal Studies major integrates skills and knowledge from previous course work with the career perspective of the elementary classroom teacher. The value of liberal education is considered. Students develop portfolios that sample their best work and show the relevance of that work to teaching. Students also develop a resource unit or other project in collaboration with concentration advisor. Senior standing required.

EDU2886 Special Topics (0.5 - 3)
Workshops offered periodically on contemporary issues of special interest in Education.
EDU2994 Teaching Assistant (0-4)
This is an opportunity for advanced student to earn credit by special arrangement with the Department Chair. The required work will vary.

EDU2999 Independent Study in Education (1-3)
Provides an opportunity for independent study or research in Education under the direction of the instructor and Department Chair. See Undergraduate Policies and Procedures section on Independent Study.

EDU4000 Advanced Administrative Leadership Concepts (3)
This first-semester course in the NDNU Clear Administrative Services Credential Program (Level II) addresses the initial component of the Level II candidate’s program, engaging the candidate in a focused self-assessment of competencies, interests, and current job responsibilities and concluding with provisions for the development of specific learning outcomes. The candidate will identify areas of need in support and mentoring while continuing to grow as an administrator. Identified individual candidate needs are aligned with the California Professional Standards for Educational Leaders during this course. Specifically developed objectives and support, mentoring, and evaluative activities are developed, and implementation and formative evaluation are ongoing throughout the program.

EDU4001 Clinical Field Leadership Activities and Applications (3)
During this field-based course, the candidate will implement, reflect upon, and evaluate the activities described in the candidate’s self-assessment and the Professional Credential Mentoring Plan (PCMP). These activities are closely aligned with an initial set of three of the
six conceptual themes leading to administrative competencies, as identified in the California Professional Standards for Educational Leaders (CPSEL). The candidate has the support of an employer representative and an NDNU mentor in developing and implementing activities identified in the PCMP for the semester. The NDNU mentor provides an evaluation statement regarding the success of the activities in relation to the conceptual themes identified from the CPSELs. The district representative then validates and signs off on completed activities.

EDU4002 Balanced School/District Leadership in Instruction and Management (3)
This second-semester course engages the Level II candidate in pursuit of the “next steps” outlined in the individual mentoring and support plan developed in EDU4000. A personal formative assessment of the candidate’s progress occurs three times during the semester with the focused input of the employer representative and the NDNU mentor. This will include an evaluation of the candidate’s success in addressing the California Professional Standards for Educational Leaders, which will be shared with the candidate. Additionally, the candidate will complete a professional portfolio, which will include activities, accomplishments, and accompanying artifacts and will be shared with cohort colleagues and the University community.

EDU4003 Clinical Field Applications to Ensure Student Success (3)
During this field-based course, the candidate will continue to implement, reflect upon, and evaluate a new set of activities described in the candidate’s self-assessment and the
Professional Credential Mentoring Plan (PCMP). These activities are closely aligned with a second set of conceptual themes identified in the California Professional Standards for Educational Leaders (CPSEL). The candidate has the support of an employer representative and an NDNU mentor in developing and implementing activities identified in the PCMP.
The NDNU mentor provides an evaluation statement regarding the success of the activities in relation to the conceptual themes identified from the CPSELs. The district representative then validates and signs off on completed activities.

EDU4100 Psychological and Developmental Foundations (3)
Investigates and critically appraises insights derived from psychology, especially as they pertain to the teaching-learning process for diverse classrooms of today. Explores theories from behavioral, humanistic, developmental, and cognitive psychology that are relevant for education. Considers effects on student learning, teacher expectations, classroom climate (affective and cognitive), classroom management, planning, diversity factors, learning styles, individual differences, motivation, and evaluation.

EDU4104 Sociological and Multicultural Foundations (3)
Analyzes major influences on American education, including social, cultural, historical,
political, and economic influences. Explores contemporary issues in education such as the nature of culture, the purposes of public schooling, the profession of teaching, the social structure and education, equality of opportunity, and multicultural education.

EDU4107 Foundations for Teaching English Learners (3)
Examines theories of second-language acquisition and historical perspectives of bilingual education. Explores factors affecting first- and second-language acquisition and bilingual education with an emphasis on instructional strategies. Includes class participation demonstrating knowledge of the content and field observations whenever possible. Covers Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE) competencies.

EDU4110 Special Education for the Classroom Teacher (2)
This course is designed to provide information, resources, and materials related to the education of students with disabilities in the general education classroom. It includes a description of the categories of disabilities as defined by the Federal law, current regulations, and the IEP/ITP process. Emphasis is placed on the strategies for modifications and accommodations necessary to provide an appropriate learning environment. Attention focuses on the support system available at the school site level.

EDU4113 Technology Applications in Education (1)
California has adopted Technology Standards that define computer-based technology use in classrooms. This course ensures that all teacher candidates understand and are able to use appropriate computer-based technology to facilitate the teaching and learning process. In addition to the California Level I Standards, the course covers issues surrounding technology use by society in general and education in particular. Also, several Teacher Performance Expectations (TPEs) from the California Standards of Quality and Effectiveness for Professional Teacher Preparation Programs are addressed in this course.

EDU4116 Health Education (1)
This course provides an introduction to health promotion through school health education.  Current literature, health education resources, and teaching strategies are introduced and discussed. This course fulfills the California State Credential requirements. CPR and First Aid are NOT included in this course.

EDU4119 Assessment in the Classroom (2)
Introduces measurement concepts needed by teachers in order to meet their instructional objectives. Students learn how to create and use assessments that guide instruction and measure results. They also learn how to communicate with students, families, and other audiences about student progress.

EDU4200 Special Education Program Management (3)
This course is designed as a seminar focusing on the coordination procedures and implementation of laws, regulations, and other requirements related to special education. The focus is on ethics, policies, and related issues for teachers of students and adults with disabilities. Topics also include training and supervision of instructional aides, staff development/in-service functions, coordination and scheduling of IEP and ITP meetings, monitoring the referral process, inclusion of special education students in the regular education classroom, record keeping, and familiarity with student and parent rights.

EDU4203 Clinical Assessment (4)
This course is designed as a survey course of diagnostic assessment tools used by special education teachers. Competencies and understanding of the historical perspective, terminology, administration procedures and interpretation, cognitive assessments-academic achievement assessments, current research in learning styles, and adaptation to Individualized Educational Programs are addressed. Students are expected to administer and interpret various assessment instruments.

EDU4207 Technology - Special Education (3)
Introduces developmental and methodological foundations for the use of current technologies and practical application to the special education classroom. The use of low-tech to high-tech devices as assistive technology in meeting IEP needs of students is emphasized. Emphasis is also placed on learning the tools to enhance communication, information access, use of adaptive devices, use of current software/hardware, and problem-solving for the special education and regular education classroom.

EDU4209 Counseling – Special Education (3)
This course surveys the various support systems that can be used with special education children and families. An understanding of in-district and community agencies is examined. Effective communication techniques for counseling students and families with special needs are emphasized. Current research and publications that deal with assisting students' families are explored. Developing behavior plans for classrooms and individuals and the use of questionnaires, health histories, and other related information are also explored.

EDU4230 Student/Intern Teaching Seminar (Special Education) (1-5)
Corequisite:
EDU4203
This course has the same focus as EDU4342, but in a special education setting. Heavy emphasis is placed on exploring and examining solutions for day-to-day problems encountered in teaching students in special education classes, including issues such as planning, instructional problems, and evaluation.

EDU4234 Curriculum and Instruction Adaptations (Mild/Moderate Section) (3)
Involves adaptations and methods of curriculum and instruction to meet the needs of students with identified mild/moderate disabilities. This course explores services to support students with special needs in and out of the regular classroom and how additional support services such as speech, nurse, and adaptive physical education can be utilized. The role of the special education teacher as a support for children with 504 Plans is also discussed.

EDU4237 Curriculum and Instruction Adaptations (Moderate/Severe Section) (3)
Studies adaptations and methods of curriculum and instruction to meet the needs of students with identified moderate/severe disabilities. This course explores current issues and research in special education instructional methods. Topics include the role of the special day class teacher in a school setting, the coordination of services to support students with special needs in and out of the classroom, and how additional support services such as speech therapist, nurse, school psychologist, and adaptive physical education teacher can be utilized. The role of the teacher in referring to outside agencies, working with parents, and developing IEP and ITP are also discussed.

EDU4240 Emerging Research Practices in Special Education (4)
Prerequisite: Admission to the Education Specialist Program or consent of Program
Director and instructor
This course, which is taught as a seminar, covers advanced topics in special education
required for the Level II Education Specialist Credential (Mild/Moderate or Moderate Severe). The course has two main components: the seminar and assignment of a mentor.  In the seminar, the student identifies an area of expertise and does the research regarding best practices in that area.  In the mentoring component, the student is provided assistance to implement that research in his/her classroom and identify other staff development activities to further his/her expertise in the selected area of specialization.

EDU4243 Advanced Methods in Special Education: Mild/Moderate (3)
Prerequisite: Admission to the Education Specialist Program or consent of Program Director and instructor
This course covers advanced concepts required for the Level II Education Specialist Mild/Moderate Credential. Topics include data-based decision-making; advanced behavioral, emotional and environmental supports; best practices in transition and transition planning; and advanced concepts in curriculum, instruction, collaboration, and consultation.

EDU4246 Advanced Methods in Special Education: Moderate/Severe (3)
Prerequisite: Admission to the Education Specialist Program or consent of Program Director and instructor
This course covers advanced concepts required for the Level II Education Specialist Credential: Moderate/Severe. Topics include theoretical approaches in the education of students with complex emotional and behavioral needs; data-based decision-making; advanced behavioral, emotional, and environmental supports; best practices in transition and transition planning; advanced concepts in curriculum and instruction; and collaboration and consultation.

EDU4330 Elementary Reading/Language Arts: Primary Grades (3)
Surveys the teaching of beginning reading and language arts in diverse elementary classrooms. Introduces current research, principles, issues, strategies, and materials/resources for developmental processes of learning to read and write for all students. Presents theories concerning language acquisition and language development for first- and second-language learners. Constructs a literacy model with a multicultural/multilingual perspective. Concurrent course work and field placement are required to ensure application and reflective practice.

EDU4333 Elementary Reading/Language Arts: Upper Grades (3)
Prerequisite:
EDU4330
Continues examination of current research, principles, issues, strategies, and materials/resources, focusing on upper elementary students of diverse backgrounds.  Explores language acquisition issues in upper elementary grades. Facilitates connections among students, literature, and response in a multicultural perspective. Introduces literacy in content areas and SDAIE techniques for understanding literature. Concurrent course work and field placement are required to ensure continued reflection/application.

EDU4336 Curriculum – Elementary Math (2)
Emphasizes content and method of teaching elementary math concepts. This course includes all eight strands of the state mathematics framework. Students learn hands-on methods designed for prospective teachers.

EDU4339 Curriculum – Social Studies/Science (2-3)
Students develop expertise in planning, implementing, and assessing integrated science and social studies curriculum and experiment with a variety of strategies and techniques designed to promote higher-level thinking and provide for differences in teaching a diverse, multilingual, and multicultural population.

EDU4342 Student/Intern Teaching/Seminar (Multiple Subject - 1st semester) (4)
Focuses on orientation to and observation of realities of teaching through weekly seminars and on-site assignments in public and private schools. As candidates take charge of classes under the direction of master teachers, seminar sessions enriched by guest speakers stress class management and control, lesson planning, curriculum development, and organization and use of class time. Heavy emphasis is placed on examining solutions for the day-to-day problems that candidates are experiencing.

EDU4345 Student/Intern Teaching/Seminar (Multiple Subject - 2nd semester) (4)
Continuing candidates are provided with an opportunity to reflect upon and improve the field experience. Candidates are encouraged to discuss problems and reactions to their field experiences. Normally, at least one-half of the class is focused on candidates' concerns. Performance Assessment for California Teachers (PACT) is the focus of this course.

EDU4400 Orientation to Teaching (1)
Teacher candidates are oriented to the Single Subject Credential Program and the teaching profession. Program-related topics and legal requirements such as Teaching Performance Expectations (TPEs), Teaching Performance Assessment (TPA), and portfolio development
are introduced. Other topics include, but are not limited to, classroom management, teaching and learning in a standards-based environment, and setting high expectations for all students. This is one of the first courses for ALL students in the Single Subject Credential Program.

EDU4404 Teaching and Pedagogy (2)
Corequisite
: EDU4342
This course is coordinated by an NDNU faculty member and jointly taught by mentor teachers from local schools. The focus of this course is teaching the state adopted academic content standards using effective strategies in the discipline of the teacher candidate.

EDU4407 Secondary Curriculum (2-3)
Develops expertise in curriculum planning applied to the subject area and presents strategies and techniques that provide for teaching a diverse population. Direct instruction, questioning techniques, small-group discussions, and higher order thinking skills are included and used by the student in designing a unit of instruction.

EDU4410 Language and Literacy in the Content Areas (3)
Introduces current research, principles, issues, strategies, and resources with respect to language and literacy in Single Subject content areas. Focuses on Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE) for language minority students. Field experience in public school is required.

EDU4442 Student/Intern Teaching/Seminar (Single Subject, 1st semester) (4)
Focuses on orientation to and observation of realities of teaching through weekly seminars and on-site assignments in public and private schools. As candidates take charge of classes under the direction of master teachers, seminar sessions enriched by guest speakers stress class management and control, lesson planning, curriculum development, and organization and use of class time. Heavy emphasis is placed on examining solutions for the day-to-day problems that candidates are experiencing.

EDU4445 Student/Intern Teaching/Seminar (Single Subject - 2nd semester) (4)
Continuing candidates are provided with an opportunity to reflect upon and improve the field experience. Candidates are encouraged to discuss problems and reactions to their field experiences. Normally, at least one-half of the class is focused on candidates' concerns. Preparation of a professional portfolio is required for both Multiple Subject and Single Subject candidates.

EDU4500 Current Research and Practice in Literacy Education (3)
A survey of current research, principles, issues, concepts, and approaches for both developmental and remedial factors involved in learning to read and write and the efficacy of each. The course also gives students a historical perspective of the development of different approaches. Finally, it is designed to give students a construct of an effective literacy model in order to analyze assessment and instruction that exist in different school settings.
EDU4503 Assessment-based Instruction in Reading and the Language Arts – Early Literacy (3)
Emphasizes language arts assessment and instruction for students in the stages of early literacy, both younger and older students. The assessments studied range from formal, standardized group tests to formal, standardized individual tests to authentic, informal assessments. Students practice with the various types of assessments both in class and through field experiences outside of class. Students use a case-study approach not only to become familiar with the assessments but also to decide on appropriate instructional methods and techniques based on assessment data.

EDU4506 Clinical Application I – Early Literacy (3)
Prerequisite: EDU4503
A practicum in the field dealing with students at the early stages of literacy (either younger or older students). The candidates are required to spend 60 hours teaching in a small-group setting with preparation time for each session and 15 hours in the practicum seminar. The candidates utilize the various appropriate standardized and informal methods of assessment for the students in this stage of literacy, design appropriate instruction based on those assessments, teach the individuals in the group, and do ongoing assessments and final evaluations.

EDU4509 Assessment-based Instruction in Reading and the Language Arts – Intermediate and Advanced Learners Literacy (3)
Prerequisite: EDU4503
Emphasizes language arts assessment and instruction for students in the intermediate and advanced stages of literacy. The assessments studied range from formal, standardized group
tests to formal, standardized individual tests to authentic, informal assessments. Students practice with the various types of assessments both in class and through field experiences outside of class. Students use a case-study approach not only to become familiar with the assessments, but also to decide on appropriate instructional methods and techniques based on assessment data.

EDU4512 Clinical Application II – Intermediate and Advanced Literacy (3)
Prerequisite: EDU4509
A practicum in the field dealing with students at the intermediate to advanced stages of literacy (either younger or older students). The candidates are required to spend 60 hours teaching in a small-group setting with preparation time for each session and 15 hours in the practicum seminar. The candidates utilize the various appropriate standardized and informal methods of assessment for the students in these stages of literacy, design appropriate instruction based on those assessments, teach the individuals in the group, and do ongoing assessments and final evaluations.

EDU4515 Current Issues in Literacy: Research and Practice (3)
Prerequisites: EDU4500, EDU4503, EDU4506, EDU4509, EDU4512
This course on current issues deals with such topics as balance in reading/language arts curricula, the role of phonemic awareness, phonics and spelling in literacy instruction, instruction for struggling readers, literacy materials, the transformation of assessment procedures, the nature of reading at different levels (e.g., emergent, early learners, developing, and independent readers), content literacy, process writing, multicultural diversity, and the study of a common ground for research and practice.

EDU4518 Program Development and In-service Leadership in Literacy Education (3)
Prerequisites: EDU4512, EDU4515
This course prepares candidates to design reading programs on various levels K-Adult as well as to provide in-service to teachers regarding these programs. Topics include such elements as the factors involved in effective literacy programs at different levels (that include standards-based programs), roles and responsibilities of reading specialists, models for professional development and in-service, selection of program materials, program assessment, community involvement, interconnections of all language arts, the use of technology in program design, and the inclusion of special curricula for students with special needs, including those with cultural diversity.

EDU4521 Clinical Application III - Advanced (3)
Prerequisite: EDU4518
This practicum course in the field deals with students who are severely disabled in the area of literacy (either younger or older students). The candidates are required to spend 60 hours teaching in a small-group setting with preparation time for each session and 15 hours in the
practicum seminar. The candidates learn and utilize the various appropriate formal and informal methods of assessment appropriate for the students with severe problems in literacy, design appropriate instruction based on those assessments, teach the individuals in
the group, and do on-going assessments and final evaluations.

EDU4600 Financial Management (3)
This course is designed to develop candidates’ leadership capacity and knowledge base in collaboratively aligning fiscal, human, and material resources (including technology) to support the learning of all subgroups of students while ensuring optimum management of the organization, operation, and resources for a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment. The principles and concepts in public fiscal management, budget development, revenue, and taxation policies will be explored. The final project will include the development of a budget spreadsheet with a time-process plan to ensure collaborative budget development, taking student learning into a role of primary consideration, which will be presented with oral rationalization to a variety of audiences (staff, community, parents, central office personnel).

EDU4604 Human Resource Management in the School/District (2)
This course is intended to help educational leaders at the school and district level develop knowledge and capacity to perform effectively in the area of human resources (HR) and build high performing human resource teams in schools and districts. The focus of the course will be on how the HR function in general serves the needs of all other parts of a system of education and yet has its own unique character within the system. Since the HR function consumes at least 80 percent of the school/district budget and also consumes a great deal of the school district’s time and energy, the HR system of a school/district must be carefully considered by the educational leader. It follows that the HR system of a school/district is directly related to the overriding purpose of school in terms of student achievement. While the essential organization of this course is toward developing human and organizational capacities, particular emphasis will be given to the application of knowledge and skills to authentic problems of practice within a school/district in order to develop research-based solutions to these problems.

EDU4606 Leadership Concepts (3)
This course will explore the historical and philosophical approaches to educational leadership and include identification of personal leadership strengths. The concept of facilitating the development of a shared vision for the achievement and success of all students based upon relevant quantitative and qualitative measures of student learning will be a primary focus. Through an emphasis on personal leadership practices and their potential impact and influence on the performance of other adults and students, candidates will come to realize the importance of educational leadership in a democratic society. The candidate will recognize the primary function of the ability to communicate and implement a shared vision so that the entire school community understands and acts on the mission of the school as standards-based educational system. Candidates will come to know and experience the leadership roles inherent in shaping school programs, plans, and activities to ensure integration, articulation, and consistency with the shared vision.

EDU4609 Organization and Management (3)
This course covers the principles and concepts of management theory, including an historical overview. The managerial functions of leading, planning, organizing, and staffing are focused upon with an emphasis on how these functions are being facilitated by instructional leadership through communication and participatory decision-making.  Organizational behavior patterns in management will be explored through assigned readings,
small-group discussions, guest speakers, and selected videos. There is an emphasis on what makes public organizations distinctive and analyzing the environment of schools through problem-based learning assignments.

EDU4612 Advanced Curriculum Design (3)
Explores the work of Wiggins and McTighe in the integration of curriculum, instruction, and assessment. Examining what is essential in subject matter is a major thrust of the course. Students learn how to determine the essential understandings of a unit, course, or discipline. Based on these understandings, students learn how to select instructional materials and resources and how to determine teaching strategies and student activities with built-in processes and tasks for gathering evidence and evaluating student progress along the way.

EDU4621 School/Parent/Community Relations (3)

This course will cover changing social and institutional conditions, including public relations in the age of information, the effective use of administrative technology for communication, identification and analysis of community resources, and ways to work effectively with parents, community agencies, and special interest groups as well as working with a culturally
diverse school community. Candidates will examine and evaluate their own attitudes toward people of different races, cultures, and ethnic backgrounds as well as examine their attitudes toward sexual orientation and individuals with disabilities, so they will become aware of their individual feelings and be able to be an effective leader in a diverse setting, finding value in all individuals. Special emphasis will be put on an educational leader’s primary focus in mobilizing community resources in the service of student achievement and incorporating
family and community expectations in school decision-making activities. This course includes a written practicum that will reflect work on an administrative project supervised by an on-site administrator (who serves as a partner in field-based experience) and approved by the instructor. The project will be congruous with the course objectives for learning.

EDU4624 School Law, Governance, and Politics (3)
This course introduces the candidate to the basic concepts of school governance, law, and politics with an overview of our educational system at the federal, state, and local levels.  State-adopted content standards for students will be examined, and candidates will develop an understanding of the critical role of instructional leadership in monitoring the educational needs of all students. The course will cover the interaction of historical and philosophical forces that give rise to various institutionalized practices and laws and focus on the interaction of administrative, legal, and political forces and issues, which need careful consideration and/or potential action and advocacy on the part of instructional leaders. This course includes a written practicum that will reflect work on an administrative project supervised by an on-site administrator (who serves as a partner in field-based experiences) and approved by the instructor.  The project will be congruous with the course objectives for learning.

EDU4627 Program Initiation and Implementation (3)
This course begins with an historical overview of the forces affecting schooling in America.  Social, political, and economic forces are considered in the journey of American education as are the variety of trends and program implemented on the curricular landscape over the
course of two centuries. The candidate will explore the roles and resultant implications of the actions of a variety of stakeholder groups in curriculum development and program implementation. Procedures and strategies for implementing special programs and mandates will be identified and discussed. Professional development issues (as a part of program implementation) and collaborative team building will be themes in class discussion and practicum projects.  Candidates will be introduced to the process of design, initiation, and implementation of school and district goals and objectives and the place of the school site plan in the process. While candidates will be able to facilitate the critical process pieces in the development, implementation, and evaluation of the school site plan, the culminating experience in this course will be the candidate’s practicum project in which the candidate will design, initiate, and implement an educational program aimed at the improvement of student achievement. This course includes a written practicum that will reflect work on an administrative project supervised by an on-site administrator (who serves as a partner in field-based experiences) and approved by the instructor.  The project will be congruous with the course objectives for learning.

EDU4630 Models of Teaching and Supervision (3)
Students learn and apply the skills, strategies, and maps of cognitive coaching to coach and mentor colleagues at all levels – beginning to experienced, incompetent to highly effective. Through readings, practice, discussions, personal reflections, and collaborative work, students become knowledgeable about and understand the Cognitive Coaching model. They learn to mediate thinking and states of mind (inner resources) in self and others, to identify and develop a leadership stance that is focused on equity, to recognize and model effective teaching and leadership, and to use the California Standards for the Teaching Profession (CSTP) to support their coaching and mentoring activities. Students also identify and engage in professional and personal applications of Cognitive Coaching.

EDU4700 Trends in Curriculum Development (3)
This course, imperative for the instructional leader’s role, is an essential ingredient in planning for the improvement of student achievement. The underlying theme echoes that positive change is put down when purpose and effort unite. The course considers curriculum development and inclusive influential factors. Current and historical background trends are explored. Integral instructional leadership roles in curricular planning and decision-making processes are emphasized. Additionally, the concept of the integration of subject matter and multicultural perspectives and resources, critical thinking, and communication skills with technological resources is woven throughout the course.

EDU4703 Educational Assessment/Evaluation (3)
This course applies the basic principles of measurement and evaluation to the classroom, the school, and the district. In addition, it addresses the practical problems and concerns facing teachers and schools in dealing with data-driven decision-making and evaluation.  Course readings, discussions, and activities explore the arguments in favor of and against standards-based and standardized testing and analyze, synthesize, and evaluate the different categories and uses of tests: norm-references, criterion-referenced, and performance assessment. Finally, the course explores issues surrounding the use of student assessment results and teacher evaluation.

EDU4706 Social Justice, Diversity, and Equity (3)
This course examines the function of schooling within a culturally diverse, democratic
society. Course readings explore the current context of schooling and the ways in which schools currently perpetuate inequities. Course discussions and class projects analyze exemplary practices and visions of what school could be like for all students. Throughout the course, students develop strategies for reviewing practices in ways that promote equity.

EDU4709 Learning, Technology, and Curriculum (1-3)
This survey course expands and extends the content of EDU4113. It provides students with an overview of and practice with a variety of technologies used in education. Course content includes K-12 curricular uses of camcorders, videodiscs, digital media tools, simulation and problem-solving applications, multimedia authoring tools, and telecommunications. Emphasis is placed upon determining appropriate use of technology, managing the learning process in the classroom, and setting and assessing student outcomes utilizing the performance standards recommended by the State of California for adoption at the district level.

EDU4712 Building Online Learning Communities (3)
This course introduces contemporary methods used by educators to promote learning for all children using Internet resources. Emphasis is placed upon the integration of networking and telecommunications media in the subject areas. Student projects include research into current classroom practices and materials, World Wide Web page design, and discussion of the implications for legal, ethical, and moral use of the Internet and telecommunications media.

EDU4715 Media, Medium, and Method (3)
This applied course examines the appropriate use of multimedia technology as a tool for implementing curriculum. Students learn to discern the appropriate media to meet a specific curriculum objective and to evaluate the merits of using various educational software programs as the medium to create a product. Through guided hands-on practice with the
technologies, students demonstrate how to address the needs of individual learning styles in a diverse cultural environment through multimedia. Teams of students apply theories of learning, methods of teaching, and principles of multimedia design to the creation of interdisciplinary curriculum projects.

EDU4718 Contemporary Topics in Leadership and Technology (3)
This course provides the candidate with a broad range of contemporary topics that address the intersection of leadership and technology. The course is intended to help educational leaders at the school and district level develop knowledge and capacity to perform effectively through directly addressing issues of student achievement with the study of leadership strongly supported by expertise in the area of technology and communications. The focus of the course will be on how technology used optimally serves the needs of professional educators in closing the achievement gap among students and target the unique needs of classrooms, schools, and districts. Leadership in the area of technology in a school/district,
when used to focus in on learning objectives and subsequent results, can be directly related to the overriding purpose of schools in terms of student achievement. The essential orientation of this course is on addressing the critical intersect of leadership, technology and
student achievement. Critical emphasis will be given to the application of knowledge and skills and to authentic problems of practice within a school/district in order to develop research-based solutions to these challenges.

EDU4721 Introduction to Educational Research (3)
This is the first course of a two-course series (EDU4724 is the second course) designed to support students in writing the master's thesis. Course readings, discussions, and activities engage students in developing the skills, habits, and knowledge needed to engage in research that is both scholarly and action-based. Students identify a research question, review, analyze, and synthesize the literature pertaining to the question, and develop ethical and reliable methods to conduct research in the field.  Students complete the thesis proposal in the context of this course and submit it for approval to NDNU’s Institutional Review Board.

EDU4724 Educational Research (1-3)
Prerequisite:
EDU4721
EDU4724 specifically assumes that students have a completed and approved thesis proposal. The course supports students in obtaining informed consent to begin research in the field and introduces them to methods for analyzing qualitative and quantitative data.  Discussions and activities guide students through data collection, analysis, and completion of the final thesis. Students must file the thesis before the end date of the course.

EDU4803 Advanced Strategies for English Learners (3)
This advanced course focuses on the delivery of comprehensive, specialized instruction for English learners. Building on the knowledge, skills, and abilities candidates acquired during the preliminary credential program, the course advances candidates' ability to implement the adopted instructional program for English Language Development. Candidates implement instructional programs for the development of academic language, comprehension, and knowledge in the core academic curriculum. They demonstrate the ability to promote English learners' access and achievement in relation to state-adopted academic content standards and performance levels.  Participating teachers evaluate English language proficiency and consider students' backgrounds, experiences, and family structure in developing and implementing standards-based English Language Development (ELD) and Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE) lessons. They demonstrate expertise in the use of local and state-adopted assessments for English language proficiency by using assessment information in the development, delivery, and adjustment of instruction. Candidates implement a variety of methods to promote effective communication with parents and families, and they demonstrate knowledge of the school organizational structures and resources designed to meet the needs of English learners.

EDU4880 Educational Research Capstone (3)
Prerequisite:
All other course work in the master's degree program; MA Special Education students may be concurrently enrolled in EDU4230.
This is the capstone course for students completing the Master of Arts in Special Education.  In lieu of a thesis, students develop a portfolio based on the California Standards for the Teaching Profession. The portfolio demonstrates that the student has the capacity to integrate research and practice in his/her classroom work with students with disabilities.

EDU4881 Capstone Course in Administrative Services, Tier 1 Program (1)
The Capstone Course in the Administrative Services Program at Notre Dame de Namur
University reflects the Program’s intent to prepare educational leaders who are innovative thinkers equipped with 21st century skills and whose reflective thinking and resultant action are tied to the continual improvement of student achievement. The capstone course establishes a forum for students to demonstrate that they have the capacity to be such educational leaders. The capstone course experience is problem-centered and allows for the active integration and application of the knowledge base established during the duration of the Administrative Services Program.

EDU4900 Introduction to Autism Spectrum Disorders (3)
This course develops the candidate’s understanding of the unique characteristics of students with Autism Spectrum Disorders from preschool through high school. Participants will become familiar with the core challenges associated with language and communication, cognition and neurology, social skills and behavior, processing, and implications for program planning and service delivery.

EDU4901 Advanced Strategies for Teaching Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (3)
This course develops the candidate’s knowledge, skills, and abilities for educating students with ASD, utilizing evidence-based and multi-faceted methodologies and strategies. Participants will become familiar with formal and informal teaching tools specific to the ASD population to ensure students reach their maximum potential across all areas of development. Behavioral-based teaching strategies, structured teaching, visual support strategies, positive behavior supports, and working with team members will be discussed.
All strategies will be related back to core goals and curriculum to ensure the candidate’s ability to integrate acquired knowledge into day-to-day programming. Participants will be able to recognize and describe the characteristics of learners with Autism Spectrum
Disorders. They will also be able to describe the causes and prevalence of the spectrum. Participants will be able to describe various types of intervention strategies available to school-based personnel.

EDU4902 Behavior Management Techniques (3)
This course utilizes the candidate’s understanding of students with ASD gained in EDU4900 to develop knowledge, skills, and abilities for educating students with ASD utilizing evidence-based and multifaceted methodologies and strategies. Participants will become familiar with formal and informal assessment tools to drive program development and ensure students are reaching their maximum potential across all areas of development. Systems for collaborating with other service providers will be provided.

EDU4903 Autism Mentoring and Capstone Seminar (1-3)
This seminar course addresses significant issues that must be understood and addressed by the ASD practitioner. Additionally, participants will have 30 hours of observation time in an ASD classroom. This allows participants to observe the implementation of best practices.
Observation hours will be spent under the guidance of the seminar instructor and will allow the participant to view a variety of service delivery systems to this population. The final project will be a research paper on best practices based on peer-reviewed journal articles for including the child with ASD in the school community.