Students hanging out in New Hall quad

Catalog

English

ENG1008 The Bohemian (1-2)
Gives practical experience in all facets of editing, emphasizing the criteria that constitute good writing; writers and would-be writers are encouraged to join. May be repeated for credit.

ENG1030 Freshman Composition (3)
This freshman-level course in writing is designed to prepare students for college writing in a variety of disciplines, and it focuses on a number of issues related to effective writing, including research and documentation, critical reading, and thinking. Instruction emphasizes writing as a process (from brainstorming and creating a rough draft to producing a final draft and engaging in meaningful revision). Diverse readings consist primarily of nonfiction texts, and students are encouraged to develop critical reading skills in their disciplines. Both MLA and APA forms of documentation are taught.  Required to fulfill General Education Lower-Division Writing Requirement for students matriculating in or after Fall 2011.

ENG1032 Introduction to Literature (4)
Explores expository and critical writing based on reading, discussion, and analysis of great works of literature from three major genres: narrative, lyric, and drama. Lab section meets weekly in the Writing Center. Required to fulfill General Education College Writing Requirement for students who matriculated prior to Fall 2011.

ENG1040 Classics of World Literature I (3)
Expository and critical writing based on reading, discussion, and analysis of the great works of the Ancient, Medieval, and Renaissance periods, including non-Western literature. Required of all freshmen to fulfill General Education Literature requirement.

ENG1041 Classics of World Literature II (3)
Continuation of ENG1040, exploring great works of literature of the Renaissance, the Neoclassical Age, the Romantic Revolt, and the 20th century, including non-Western and ethnic American literature. Fulfills General Education Literature requirement.

ENG2000 Writing Center (1-3)
Develops the writing process. Topics include brainstorming, clustering, outlining, freewriting, editing, and revising. Students receive individual tutoring in grammar, research, and essay organization. Upon completion of 1 unit, a student may enroll for an additional unit in the same semester. Students enrolled in writing-intensive courses enroll concurrently for 1 unit of ENG2000. The amount of work required for upper-division credit will differ in both quantity and quality from that required for lower-division credit. Units apply toward the Upper-Division Writing requirement.

ENG2008 The Bohemian (1-2)
Gives practical experience in all facets of editing, emphasizing the criteria that constitute good writing; writers and would-be writers are encouraged to join. May be repeated for credit. The amount of work required for upper-division credit will differ in both quantity and quality from that required for lower-division credit.

ENG2010 Writing in the Disciplines (3)
This course aims to strengthen the writing of upper-division students in their disciplines, preparing them to excel in course work in their majors and in their postgraduate vocations. While attention will be paid to all aspects of writing, including grammar, syntax, and style, emphasis will be placed on the discourse and conventions of the discipline. All students will engage in certain forms of writing common to the workplace (memos, letters, e-mails, reports, proposals, etc); individual students will also practice writing that is unique to their field. Students will also collaborate on writing projects, emulating real work environments. Fulfills Upper-Division Writing requirement.

ENG2108 Advanced Writing (3)
Offers intensive practice of expository writing and other forms of writing, emphasizing the writing process and including workshopping of works in progress; includes study of rhetoric, critical thinking, composition theory, and modes of great writing. Fulfills Upper-Division Writing requirement.

ENG2142 Creative Writing (3)
Study and practice of a variety of literary genres, including poetry, fiction, and memoir. May be repeated for credit.

ENG2144 Creative Writing: Poetry (3)
Focuses on writing and sharing poetry through workshopping and nurturing feedback; beginning as well as advanced writers are welcomed. May be repeated once for credit. Concurrent enrollment in ENG2008 The Bohemian is strongly recommended.

ENG2148 Creative Writing: Fiction (3)
Focuses on writing and sharing of short narratives with emphasis on workshopping works in progress; attention is paid to formal elements – narrative structure, character, point of view, style, detail, imagistic patterns, and themes. May be repeated once for credit. Concurrent enrollment in ENG2008 The Bohemian is strongly recommended.

ENG2152 Creative Writing: Playwriting (3)
Focuses on the study and practice of the art of playwriting, including writing, blocking, and performing short scenes in collaboration with other students. May be repeated once for credit. Concurrent enrollment in ENG2008 The Bohemian is strongly recommended.

ENG2156 Creative Writing: Screenwriting (3)
Working individually and collaboratively, students develop short screenplays, learning and perfecting the techniques of the craft. May be repeated once for credit. Concurrent enrollment in ENG2008 The Bohemian is strongly recommended.

ENG2164 Linguistics (3)
Studies language acquisition, variation, and usage with special emphasis on the structure and history of English. Especially useful for prospective teachers.

ENG2200 Survey of American Literature I (3)
Explores American literature from its beginnings to the mid-19th century, including the Colonial, Revolutionary, and post-Revolutionary periods. Authors studied may include Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Poe, and Dickinson. Fulfills General Education Literature requirement.

ENG2201 Survey of American Literature II (3)
Investigates American literature from the mid-19th century to the present, emphasizing realism, naturalism, modernism, and postmodernism. Fulfills General Education Literature requirement.

ENG2220 American Literary Movements: Jazz Age (1)
Studies the art, literature, and music of the 1920s, including Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby. Fulfills 1 unit of General Education Literature requirement.

ENG2222 American Literary Movements: Harlem Renaissance (CDiv) (1)
Studies the art, music, and literature of the Harlem Renaissance, including the works of Hughes, Hurston, and Toomer. Fulfills 1 unit of General Education Literature requirement.

ENG2224 American Literary Movements: Beat Poets (1)
Studies the achievements of the Beat Poets, including Kerouac's On the Road and Ginsberg's poetry. Fulfills 1 unit of General Education Literature requirement.

ENG2248 Great American Writer: Hawthorne (1)
Includes study of Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter and major stories. Fulfills 1 unit of General Education Literature requirement.

ENG2252 Great American Writer: Melville (1)
Study of Moby Dick and other works. Fulfills 1 unit of General Education Literature requirement.

ENG2256 Great American Writer: Twain (1)
Investigates Huckleberry Finn, Tom Sawyer, and selected short stories. Fulfills 1 unit of General Education Literature requirement.

ENG2260 Great American Writers: Hemingway (1)
Study of Hemingway’s major novels and selected short stories. Fulfills 1 unit of General Education Literature requirement.

ENG2264 Great American Writers: Faulkner (1)
Study of Faulkner’s major novels and selected short stories. Fulfills 1 unit of General Education Literature requirement.

ENG2268 Great American Writers: Morrison  (CDiv) (1)
Study of Morrison’s major novels, including Beloved. Fulfills 1 unit of General Education Literature requirement.

ENG2270 Great American Writers: Poe (1)
Reading and analysis of Poe’s poetry and short stories. Fulfills 1 unit of General Education Literature requirement.

ENG2272 Great American Writers: Dickinson (CDiv) (1)
In-depth study of Dickinson’s poems. Fulfills 1 unit of General Education Literature requirement.

ENG2274 Great American Writers: Wharton (CDiv) (1)
Study of selected novels by Wharton. Fulfills 1 unit of General Education Literature requirement.

ENG2400 British Literature: Myth, Epic, and Romance (3)
Introduces students to masterpieces of the Middle Ages, including Beowulf and the works of Chaucer and the Pearl Poet. Fulfills General Education Literature requirement.

ENG2403 British Literature: The Age of Elizabeth (3)
Focuses on the English Renaissance (exclusive of Shakespeare) with emphasis on Renaissance sonnet cycles and drama (Marlowe, Jonson, Webster). Fulfills General Education Literature requirement.

ENG2408 British Literature: Enlightenment and Revolution (3)
Study of major works on the Augustan Age (Milton, Pope, Swift) and the Romantic Revolt (Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats). Fulfills General Education Literature requirement.

ENG2412 British Literature: Modernism and Postmodernism (3)
Investigates late 19th century and 20th century British literature, including the Victorians, Modernists, and Postmodernists. Fulfills General Education Literature requirement.

ENG2544 Shakespeare (3)
Focuses on reading and analysis of selected masterpieces of the great bard with emphasis on the development of his career and the genres of history, tragedy, comedy, and romance. Fulfills General Education Literature requirement.

ENG2545 Shakespeare in Ashland (1-3)
Includes attendance of Shakespeare plays at the annual Ashland Shakespeare Festival (every August in Oregon). Three units fulfill the General Education Literature requirement.

ENG2600 Women's Literature (CDiv) (3)
Focuses on reading and appreciation of literature written by women with an emphasis on a particular genre or genres such as the novel, poetry, and short story. Readings emphasize topics and themes that are most pertinent to women's concerns of the past and present. Fulfills General Education Literature requirement.

ENG2604 African-American Literature (CDiv) (3)
Gives a comprehensive overview of African-American literature from the slave narratives to the Harlem Renaissance to contemporary writers, including Toni Morrison. Fulfills General Education Literature requirement.

ENG2608 Asian-American Literature (CDiv) (1)
Briefly surveys Asian-American literature from the earliest immigrant poems to contemporary novels, poems, and plays. Fulfills 1 unit of General Education Literature requirement.

ENG2612 Latino Literature (CDiv) (1)
Gives an overview of Latino literature, including study of Rudolfo Anaya's Bless Me, Ultima. Fulfills 1 unit of General Education Literature requirement.

ENG2616 Native American Literature (CDiv) (1)
Studies representative works of Native American writers, including Native American songs and 20th century fiction and nonfiction. Fulfills 1 unit of General Education Literature requirement.

ENG2624 Children's Literature (3)
Extensively explores children's literature from early folk and fairy tales to contemporary issues in the field; emphasizes reading, evaluating, and selecting books for children as a vital part of child development and childhood creativity. Especially useful for prospective teachers. Fulfills General Education Literature requirement.

ENG2632 Graphic Novels and Manga (CDiv) (3)
Comparative study of Anglo-American graphic novels and Japanese manga, including analysis of anime and animated film. Fulfills General Education Literature requirement.

ENG2636 Mythology of Superheroes (CDiv) (3)
Study of world mythology with emphasis on the concepts of heroism and superheroism, including readings of classical myths and 20th century embodiments in American and Japanese superheroes as manifested in graphic novels and manga. Fulfills General Education Literature requirement.

ENG2642 History of World Cinema (CDiv) (3)
A study of the history of film from a global perspective, including developments of film technology, concepts of film theory, methodology of interpreting films, and various uses of film as a vehicle of cultural representation, with emphasis on cross-cultural influences and collaboration.  Classes include weekly film viewings and critical discussions.

ENG2646 Detective Fiction (3)
An exploration of hard-boiled detective fiction, a tough, unsentimental style of American crime writing that brought a new tone of earthy realism or naturalism to the field of crime fiction. This type of fiction refers as much to style as to content; it describes a story in which the characters and the dialogue are, at once, rough and colloquial.  Hard-boiled fiction is contrasted with classic detective stories; this genre is examined through a cultural and postcolonial theoretical lens. Fulfills General Education Literature requirement.

ENG2650 Modern Poetry (3)
A course designed to enhance the ability to think, discuss and write about the aesthetic experience of modern poetry, from Shakespeare to the present.  What is a “poem” and what is its value?  What constitutes the literary canon and how do contemporary genres, such as popular song lyrics, relate to it? Fulfills General Education Literature requirement.

ENG2656 Literary Theory (3)
Introduction to major theories about literature from the ancient Greeks (Plato, Aristotle) to the 20th century, including major approaches such as formalist, feminist, Marxist, deconstruction, and new historical, applying these theories to sample literary works. This junior-level course is required of English majors and open to all students interested in the nature of literary interpretation. Fulfills General Education Literature requirement.

ENG2800 Seminar in the Humanities (3)
The Seminar in the Humanities is an intensive, one-week summer series of workshops and lectures focusing on innovative approaches to teaching English literature and composition at the high school and college levels. Topics covered include teaching to diversity, interdisciplinary approaches, team teaching, use of media and the Internet, effective reading strategies, incorporating community-based learning, and motivating and challenging students through creative assignments. May be taken to satisfy upper-division, graduate, or continuing education units. May be repeated for credit.

ENG2990C Internship (CE) (3)
Majors and minors may prepare for careers in teaching, writing, and editing by tutoring in the Writing Center, working as teaching assistants in English classes and working off campus as tutors, editorial assistants, or interns in technical writing and other fields. See the Department's brochure giving details about this exciting program.

ENG2997 Senior Seminar (3)
Students engage in a directed research project concentrating upon a writer, period, or theme of the student's choice. Students should consult the Department Chair during their junior year to define their projects in order to read primary materials before their senior year. Fulfills General Education Literature requirement.

ENG4000 Seminar in Literature (3)
This is a methods and content course, involving reading of critical texts in conjunction with primary texts. Students entertain alternative interpretations of the selected literary works.

ENG4005 Language: Theory and Practice (3)
Investigates current writing theory and practice in various forms of writing, including fiction, article writing, and technical writing with an emphasis on process and methodology.

ENG4016 Narrative (3)
Gives an advanced study of major forms of narrative (epic, romance, novel, short story) from antiquity to the present with emphasis on theoretical understanding of the genre. Students evaluate selected literary masterpieces in terms of classical and contemporary critical approaches. May be repeated for credit.

ENG4024 Lyric (3)
Focuses on study and critical assessment of lyric poetry with emphasis on the works of major poets who have contributed to the development of the genre in English.

ENG4028 Drama (3)
Focuses on an understanding and appreciation of the dramatic genre from its origins to the present with special attention given to the development of British and American traditions. May be repeated for credit.

ENG4032 Period Course (3)
The Period Course is an extensive study of major works representing the thematic and stylistic characteristics of primary developmental periods in the British and American literary canons. The content of the course varies from year to year depending on student and faculty interest and choice. In the past, the course has addressed the medieval, Renaissance, Romantic, early modern, postmodern, and contemporary periods of literature.

ENG4048 Creative Writing (3)
Study and practice of a variety of literary genres, including poetry, fiction, and memoir. May be repeated for credit.

ENG4800 Seminar in the Humanities (3)
The Seminar in the Humanities is an intensive, one-week summer series of workshops and lectures focusing on innovative approaches to teaching English literature and composition at the high school and college levels. Topics covered include teaching to diversity, interdisciplinary approaches, team teaching, use of media and the Internet, effective reading strategies, incorporating community-based learning, and motivating and challenging students through creative assignments. May be repeated for credit.

ENG4884 Thesis: Directed Research (3)
This is the first semester of a two-semester course during which students begin their final project, working one-on-one with a thesis advisor/first reader of their choice to produce either an extensive research-driven, critical study of an author or period of literature or to produce a collection of original creative writing.

ENG4886 Special Topics (3)
Content varies as students' needs and interest require. Content may include approaches to expository, technical, and creative writing or focus on specific authors or literary movements. Students should contact the English Department to learn the exact scheduling and content of this offering.

ENG4894 Teaching Apprenticeship (3)
Supervised experience in college teaching in the Writing Center or in a lower-division or upper-division literature course at NDNU or a local community college is available.

ENG4994 Community-Based Pedagogy/Teaching Assistantship (3)
Students in this class have the opportunity to work as teaching assistants in a variety of settings, including community college classrooms, juvenile detention facilities, and the women's jail. Each student works in the classroom with a mentor teacher for three hours per week. In addition, Community-Based Pedagogy will meet twice per month to enable students to share their experiences, role play, get support, and discuss assigned readings from the field of pedagogy.

ENG4997 Thesis: Directed Writing (3)
This is the culminating semester of the two-semester course during which students complete their final project, continuing to work one-on-one with their thesis advisor/first reader to produce an extensive research project or a collection of original creative work. The final document will be a minimum of 50 pages.